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DILILI À  PARIS (DILILI IN PARIS)

Animation, Adventure| France, Germany, Belgium | 2018 | 95 min | French English Subtitles) | 10 Years +
Director: Michel Ocelot
Immigrants Story:  New Caledonia, Kanak

With the help of her delivery-boy friend, Dilili, a young Kanak, investigates a spate of mysterious kidnappings of young girls that is plaguing Belle Epoque Paris. In the course of her investigation she encounters a series of extraordinary characters, each of whom provides her with clues that will help her in her quest… 

After Kirikou and Azur & Asmar, Michel Ocelot returns with an enchanting new tale of brave young heroes, mysteries and discoveries, kidnappings and ordeals, extraordinary places and magical encounters, in which good must challenge dark forces and triumph.

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Awards:

  • Cesar Awards - French film industry awards - Best Animated Film (2019)

 

Selections:

       (France, 2018)

Film Reviews:

Taking his lyrical and pedagogical brand of animation all the way back to La Belle Époque, writer-director Michel Ocelot offers up a pleasantly meaningful journey through French cultural history in his latest feature, Dilili in Paris.

History and culture buffs will appreciate how packed with such information the film can be, yet it’s ultimately driven by Dilili’s sincere and feisty presence. As a black girl in a nearly all-white Paris, she’s a source of both disdain (a few people call her a “monkey”) and curiosity, especially when she speaks in her impeccably polite French.

Hollywood Reporter

 

Ocelot's animation is delightful as ever. Some scenes are a riot of colour, some sparkle in a way Disney's animators could only dream of, and there is occasional use of the silhouette work that marked out films like Tales Of The Night and Ivan Tsarevitch and The Changing Princess. Dilili's very direct gaze will not easily be forgotten, though for all her spirit we are not allowed to forget that she's a child, with a child's anxieties. In a film full of remarkable people she's a reminder that even the smallest among us can make a difference, and a fantastic heroine in her own right. 

Eye for Film